Why Psychiatric Nursing?

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My name is Daniel, I was born in Edmonton, Alberta, but moved to BC’s Lower Mainland when I was 5. I now proudly call Surrey home, something I have done for over 15 years. In 2012 I married my childhood sweetheart, who I’d been dating for 6 years at that point, in 2013 we had our first child, a beautiful baby girl. At that point I had a busy budding career as a construction project manager, averaging 50-60 hours a week with my crew, leaving little time for family. I’m also a member of the Canadian Armed Forces reserves, something I have proudly done since 2005. When I have spare time, I enjoy recreational target shooting, camping, and spending quality time with my little family. We also have a cat and a dog.

I had originally wanted to work in healthcare in high school, got sidetracked around graduation and worked with the army for a few years before returning to the family business and taking over as a project manager. After the birth of my daughter, I realized I wasn’t happy with what I was doing, I enjoyed it, but something was missing. My time in the military, and cadets before that gave me a passion for helping others, and I needed a change. With my wife graduated and working, and our daughter still young we figured now was the best time. I chose the RDPN program because of my passion for helping others, I believe there is much good that I can do in this world. In the military, you work alongside people who have seen some of the worst trauma and atrocities humans can experience, you also see the aftermath of such trauma as well, that is why I chose psychiatric nursing. So far, I have opened up my mind and world to a new passion for learning that I hope will extend far beyond my time here at Stenberg. On top of my studies and family life, I am still handling construction management on a semi-part time basis.

For those considering the RDPN program but are unsure if they can do it or handle the work load, I can say from my experience it helps to have that support network. It is a fulltime commitment, especially when clinical practice begins as mine is about to, and takes excellent time management, but it is doable. Clinical practice will add an exciting new dynamic to my schedule, but I’m prepared for the task, on top of raising a family, working, studying, and allocating time for my military service. If you find yourself asking if you can do this, I would ask you what preconception is holding you back. And what can you do about it?

When I graduate and register, I hope to work in either emergency psychiatric services or crisis intervention. I look forward to blogging my experiences, good and bad, along the way, and inspire those who are looking to take a leap of faith as I did.

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